6 Reasons Why We Write

I want to spill ink onto pages that will break your heart, then mop up the careless mess into words that might fix you.

When we write, we do so for a myriad of reasons that can shift depending on our mood, our environment, events that have happened, or even our time in life.

Sometimes, it is just a bone deep desire that we can neither quantify nor explain. Sometimes we write for a broad spectrum of needs, and sometimes for only one.

So, why do we write?

  1. To express how we feel.

Writing at its most fundamental level, is a expression of our inner-most feelings. It doesn’t matter whether you are writing an extreme horror, or a children’s book. We pour our feelings out onto the pages, and may put ourselves into the mind of a psychopath, a soldier, an abandoned child, or a miss-understood teenager. We use our imagination, or our experience, or both, to live through the eyes of that person for a time.

2. To move people

A writer who can move people is a word magician. As a writer it is our aspiration to make our reader feel. The greatest writers can take readers on a roller-coaster, from the highs of joy or humour, to the lows of the darkest, most desperate, despair.

3. To create

When we write we create, be it another world, or another life, with a rich tapestry of interactions. We can create beauty, and we can create terror. Here we become the master of a universe, an all powerful being with the responsibility of life and death.

I often think that my characters possess minds of their own, and yet they are the by-product of everything I have seen, done, and experienced, whether through my own reality, or the reverie of other’s books.

4. To provoke thought

Perhaps the greatest legacy of a book is its ability to provoke thought. Through writing, we may come to question our own lives, behaviour, or even our society. We may also allow our mind to ramble in a non-judgemental way that seeks simply to understand.

5. To forget or escape

Writing, just like reading, is a mechanism of escape. Perhaps you have had a stressful day, and you need to let those issues rest. Perhaps you simply enjoy the vibrant imaginative world that lets you experience a dark, wondrous, or incredible other life.

6. To remember

Finally, we also write to remember, or perhaps more, so that we do not forget. Maybe it is our childhood, a feeling, a time, or a by-gone era.

When we write, we capture moments that are little snapshots of our inner self, and by doing so they are immortalised forever, or at least until the legacy of their electronic presence or paper fades.

Why do you write?

Book Promotion! Divided Serenity #FREE today #scifi #mystery #dystopian

It’s promotion time again!

Book 1 is Free, and book 2 is 99cents

Happy reading!

Divided Serenity (Book One) #FREE

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Divided Serenity (Divided World Book One)

He had waited ten years for revenge, they had waited eons.

John Tanis dreams of killing the man responsible for his exile.

Once loyal to the civilized Aterra, Tanis now fights for Shadowland. But the mysterious arrival of technology outside the wall heralds change.

With the dividing wall failing his new loyalties will be tested, and he must choose between revenge and saving the people he once loved.


Serenity Falling (Divided World Book Two)

Revenge is only the beginning.

Hannah thought her work in Shadowland was complete. Station 54 was operational and Aterra was once more safe. There is just one problem…no one in Aterra knows, and Bill is determined to proceed with the war.

With the door to Aterra closed, Hannah and the team head to Thale, the largest and most prestigious of the five great fortresses. But the mysterious return of a badly beaten Marcus has everyone on edge.
The people of Aterra remain ignorant of what is happening beyond their protective wall, but Theo and Nate are determined to uncover the details of Bill’s covert operations in Shadowland. That will mean infiltrating Bill’s private home. And what they uncover will make them question who is really to blame for the enduring conflict between Bill Bremmer and John Tanis.


Revealing Serenity (Divided World Book Three) 

Revenge at any cost.

With the wall once more inoperative and their weapons disabled, Aterra’s war on Shadowland is over.

Bill’s plans may be in disarray and his internal power slipping, but he is a man who knows how to adapt. He still holds the mighty Jaru war-tribe under his tenuous control, and now sets his sights on the fortress leaders as future allies in a common quest for revenge against John Tanis.

But Bill isn’t the only one interested in the Jaru war-tribe and their despot leader Ailey, and the mysterious Outliers have plans of their own.


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What readers are saying about the trilogy…

AMAZON 5STAR REVIEW

GOT + high-tech = best of both

AMAZON 5STAR REVIEW

A fast, exciting if bloody read!

AMAZON 4STAR REVIEW

A tense, gripping dystopian novel

Goodreads 5STAR REVIEW

Not a new concept – haves vs have nots, but the characters are rich, and the writing is crisp, clean, and colorful. The story is engaging, and using the characters to move the plot forward keeps the pages turning. Any book that entertains while forcing you to consider new possibilities is a winner, and Divided Serenity fits the bill.

AMAZON 5STAR REVIEW

Great book with an intriguing plot

AMAZON 5STAR REVIEW 

A great read – a great mix of adventure with a deeper intriguing universe

AMAZON 4STAR REVIEW

Medeival meets technology

Why writing a book is like creating a parallel universe #amwriting #writerslife

Choose your own outcome…

When I was little there was a children’s book I read, and in the book you got to choose what happened next. Such books were not new then, and they are still around now. I saw an adult version of this not very long ago. You know the kind…

Lots of exciting stuff has happened…do you:

  • Open the door – go to page 64
  • Turn around and walk away – go to page 72

This got me thinking about the writing process, and how, when we write, we sit out of time, as if we are sitting on the edge of countless parallel universes.

Nobody knows the exact way the book will turn out when they start to write. Writers are always talking about the way characters can surprise them, or how the story can twist unexpectedly. Our imaginations, our life journeys, our jobs and the people we spend time with can all impact the words we write on the page.

In what other ways, do we the writer, impact the story?

What if we sit down to write a chapter today, would it be the same chapter if we wrote it tomorrow instead? Would it be close, slightly different, or very different? And if it was different, could it shape the entire rest of the book?

Hence my parallel universe reference.

It’s a little mind blowing to think that if you sit down at your keyboard you may write a scene in a completely different way just because you are feeling particularly happy or particularly sad. And what if the phone rings and interrupts you, and when you come back you have decided that a character needs to die, or fall in love, or something else that you had no inkling of before.

It’s in that moment when you decide to stop writing, when you move away from your keyboard for whatever reason, must a new parallel universe inevitably pop up? Like a deck of cards on endless shuffle, or a kaleidoscope shifting sand, you never know exactly how the dice are going to fall until they do fall, or in writing terms, you sit back down at your computer. And when you do everything has shifted and you sit down to a different place and a different head space.

Every time we write a story, we could have written a million more.

Would those other variations have been better or worse or just different?

Life too, is full of choices and the consequence of those choices impact everything that comes after, so it seems only fair that our fictitious worlds should be subject to the same whims.

We might think that there are a million stories or a million lives we could have lived, but ultimately there is only one story, just as there is only one passage through our life, and that is the one we choose to write.

10 wonderful quotes about being a writer #amwriting #writer #writerslife

 


“You fail only if you stop.”

~ Ray Bradbury


“This is what separates artists from ordinary people: the belief, deep in our hearts, that if we build our castles well enough, somehow the ocean won’t wash them away.”

~ Anne Lamott


“Every human being has hundreds of separate people living under his skin. The talent of a writer is his ability to give them their separate names, identities, personalities, and have them relate to other characters living with him.”

~ Mel Brooks


“Most people carry their demons around with them, buried down deep inside. Writers wrestle their demons to the surface, fling them out onto the page, then call them characters.”

~ C.K. Webb


“The more you leave out, the more you highlight what you leave in.”

~Henry Green


“Which of us has not felt that the character we are reading in the printed page is more real than the person standing beside us?”

~ Cornelia Funke


“The writer’s curse is that even in solitude, no matter its duration, he never grows lonely or bored.”

~ Criss Jami, Killosophy


“Every writer is a frustrated actor who recites his lines in the hidden auditorium of his skull.”

~ Rod Serling


“Writing, real writing, should leave a small sweet bruise somewhere on the writer . . . and on the reader.”

~ Clarissa Pinkola Estés


“Blessed are the weird people:
poets, misfits, writers
mystics, painters, troubadours
for they teach us to see the world through different eyes.”

~ Jacob Nordby, Pearls of Wisdom: 30 Inspirational Ideas to live your best life now

Building conflict – the dastardly life of a writer 😈 #amwriting #writerslife

I’m with Bugs Bunny every time. Well, maybe not necessarily the swift part, I’m okay with revenge of all kinds in a book.

And so should every writer be

Building conflict is a natural part of writing. Take every opportunity to drive a little more drama for our heroes and heroines. Explore every option to pile on the pressure, take away safety nets, and keep your readers guessing at motives and intent.

It isn’t always easy to provide surprises, but that doesn’t mean you have to make it easy for the reader. As the saying goes the first draft is you telling yourself the book. Once you know the way the story will play out, walk through again and generously sprinkle red-herrings, weave subterfuge, and turn up the heat.

Yes, we need the balance of the good, the empathetic, and the kind, but they will shine so much brighter if you dump a little darkness on the other end of the scale.

Surprise yourself with just how dastardly you can be.

Cultivate a ‘What if’ mentality.

  • What if I pull this leaver?
  • What if I break that?
  • What if he is lying?
  • What if she is telling the truth?
  • What if I take away this?
  • What if this happens?
  • What if this doesn’t happen?

You’re a writer,  you need to give your inner bastard some air time.

Be mean. Be cruel. Be utterly wicked.

Think of the worst possible thing that could happen. The thing you would dread. The thing that would make you yell ‘NO’ if it happened to you.

And then do it.

And then do it again.

Happy writing conflict 😈

Divided Serenity (Divided World Book 1) by G.L. Cromarty

Lovely new review for Divided Serenity 🙂

BOOKS REVIEW 365

I’m really not a sc-fi fan but the imaginative world and interesting characters helped made this book somewhat likeable. I had a little trouble keeping up with the story as I stopped many times in-between. But I’m really more impressed by how the author came up with this elaborate alternative universe. ⭐⭐⭐⭐

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What do you listen to when you write? #writerslife #amwriting

Being quiet

I am guessing not everyone will share my sentiments, but for me, there is great comfort in being quiet when writing. I write best when I am sitting in my little pod office, with the lovely view of trees, and…absolute quiet.

My husband used to be incredibly noisy, which did present some problems on occasion! Recently, he has become an avid reader (he reads way more than I do now!) and I am delighted that he does this in the quiet. For the most part, when I am writing, I am left alone in this noiseless state. I do deviate occasionally, but more on that below…

E.B. White “I never listen to music when I’m working.”

Background chatter

Yes, this is the writing chimp editing in a coffee shop!

I am a self aware introvert. I accept this is what I am. That said, this desire for silence is a little extreme even amongst the introvert brigade. A few years ago I read the aptly named ‘Quiet’ by Susan Cain, a book all about being an introvert. In it, she talks about her writing routine, and she found it more productive to sit in a coffee shop to work on her book. The background chatter, and the unobtrusive presence of people helped her to focus. For her, too much isolation was actually a bad thing.

Pop music

The concept of writing anything of worth while listening to pop music is beyond my comprehension. But E.L. James  found Will.I.Am blasting in the background an inspiration when tackling her ‘naughty’ scenes! Each to their own…

Classics anyone?

Classic music can create a powerful mood in a movie, but what about when we write? I do have a few pieces that I enjoy occasionally when I want to create a pull in a particular emotional direction. I am not alone in this one…

In an interview Edmund White, the writer of award-winning fiction, biographies and memoirs, said he liked to write to chamber music by Debussy, especially the cello sonata.

Chill-out tunes / a beat without words 

This is probably one of my favorite deviations from silence. I love things with a good beat if I’m writing an action scene. It’s a great tool for visualisations!

Ambient music

A final shout out to the ambient music. Birds, wind, waterfalls, waves, the stuff you hear when you go to the spa…if you go to a spa, that kind of thing. Ambient music is all about creating a mood. There is generally no beat to it (although there might be), just drifting notes that (hopefully) create a strong or peaceful mood.

So, what do you write to?

Thoughts and suggestions? Have I missed any obvious ones? What do you like to write to?