Why everyone needs a book friend #amwriting

The books we choose to love are intensely personal items. There are a million and one books in the world, in a multitude of genres, and for every person who loves them, there will be another who thinks it should be tossed on the nearest fire.

How often do you see a book that you thought was brilliant, with a single one star review? Or something you thought so terrible you could not bear to read another page, but half the reading community thinks it’s the best thing since sliced bread.

It happens all the time.

So when you meet  someone, and discover that they love the same books as you, it can be an exciting find.

“There is no faster or firmer friendship than those formed between people who love the same books.”

Author Tip: Is Short Story Writing Something You Should Do?

Great article 🙂

Mundus Media Ink

images (4)Why Short Stories

By Michelle Rene Goodhew

You may not have considered short story writing before, but here are some reasons why you should. This article will also tell you how to go about crafting a short story.

Short stories are for everyone. They are fun and easy to read as well as easy to write. Short stories can be read in one or two sittings, they grip the reader’s attention and don’t let go until the end. They are popular. Remember all of those story ideas that just weren’t developed enough for that novel? These are perfect little critter’s to get you started writing short stories.

Maybe you are a new author just starting out trying to finish up that first great book. Or maybe you’re an experienced author working on a sequel or at best trying to dream one up. As a writer you need to keep busy…

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“And if you think that’s funny…” Writing dialog that does more than tell a story.

Great writing advice 🙂

S.L. Shelton

WakingWolfeKindleHe dropped, exhausted, into the chair next to my writing desk, his low rider holster digging rudely at the fringe of the cushion. “I heard what you said about me.”

“Get over it,” I muttered without missing a keystroke.

He leaned forward and sneered at me. I felt his glare boring into the side of my head. “You made me sound like damned amateur,” he said, separating out each syllable. “I wouldn’t even trust me based on that.”

I stopped typing and breathed in a cleansing breath before turning to him, smiling. “Get over it,” I whispered and then winked.

When I turned to resume typing, he stood abruptly. Though I continued to type, I wondered if he was about to cross the room and give me a beating. A mild wave of relief flooded my chest as he stomped away.

“Payback’s a bitch,” he said under his breath…

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Writing Cliches! – How to avoid them

We all know that cliches should be avoided like the plague, but that can be easier said than done. They can be a thorn in the writers side, and hard to spot when you can’t see the wood for the trees.

Groan…

Yes writing in cliches and / or writing a story that plays out like a cliche will make your readers groan.

Where do cliches hide

  • in common phrases or words – there may have been a few above 😉 . . . How about twisting one up? Saying the same thing from a fresh perspective? Some great examples here Rewrite (and Rev up) Cliches
  • in the story plot – the computer geek who becomes a ass-kicking ninja . . . what about an ass-kicking ninja who becomes a computer geek?
  • in the stereotypes we apply to characters – drug lords wear designer suits and speak with an Italian accent . . . how about a school teacher who is dying of cancer? Hmm worked in ‘Breaking Bad’.

So, cliches are not all bad, and can actually be used to innovate and invigorate your plot, characters and even your prose.

Have you tried playing about with writing cliches? How did you break the cliche mould?