Something a little different

I am not much of a sporting fan, but an opportunity to watch the Australian Rules football from the rather civilised vantage of the presidents suite at Perth’s Subiaco Oval, was at least partially appealing. I had fun, and sometimes it is good to do something a little different. The home team won by a whopping 54 points and so it was a great atmosphere at the stadium 🙂

It has been a mixed weekend weather-wise. We are just heading into spring, and it has alternated between brilliant sunshine and torrential rain. My garden has turned into a jungle in a very short space of time, and so I decided to tackle a bit of tidy up around the house.

Below is the before shot. Yep, a bit of a mess!

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My cat, Ted, helping in his usual way…

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All that rain and sunshine has helped my plants, very healthy, aka a jungle!

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And just to show that I can tidy up—sort of—here are the after shots.

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And in between gardening and football, I started and finished a fairly hefty scifi book. The Last Praetorian – book review

Happy reading!

What it feels like to write a book

How I feel when I start

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How I feel when I finish my first draft

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How I feel when I read my first draft

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How I feel when I start editing

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How I feel when I finish editing

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How I feel when I ask someone to read it

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Is your protagonist confused?

I may have mentioned this before, but I am a big fan of protagonists with dubious character traits. There is something about a blurry line that adds flavour to their character depth. In fact, if the protagonist was to stop and consider themselves, they would be firmly on the wrong side of that invisible virtuous line.

So in short—I like my protagonist confused.

So here is an interesting analogy to help in the confused protagonist debate: If you are the kind of person who goes to the gym 5 days a week, then going 5 days a week is no big thing. BUT, if you struggle to go once a week, then 5 days in a row is a pretty impressive feat. And so with our protagonist. The more reluctant they are, the more doing something good or heroic chafes, the more interesting it is when they are finally forced to comply.

As a reader, the more confused you are about the protagonist, the more the tension grows. Will they do the right thing? Are they capable of doing the right thing even?

And what about our antagonist? Are they wholly bad? Do they have redeeming qualities? Do you empathise with them at any point in the book? Perhaps their behaviour has been abhorrent, and then you discover a terrible secret about their past that casts new questions onto everything they have so far done.

There is a certain fascination with a good guy, who is far removed from being good. And likewise with a bad guy who is not completely bad.

Mars—the only known planet inhabited solely by robots

I saw this picture today,  of the real life Wall-E out on Mars. Curiosity, has been busy doing his thing, in a surprisingly similar way to his fictitious counterpart, made famous by Disney Pixar. If a robot could look happy, I would say Curiosity was looking pretty damn happy right now. There is also a little bit of pride—look at me—the picture seems to say.

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It struck me as a lonely life, if a robot could have such a feeling, but an industrious life all the same. Curiosity isn’t completely alone though, he has a few redundant friends such as Opportunity and Spirit, who also reside on Martian land, but there are no people, making Mars, as far as we know, the only planet to be inhabited solely by robots.

Below, Opportunity takes a shadow selfie. Those rovers know how to mix-it-up!

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There is something quintessentially human, about these robot selfies taken on Mars, and it is the nature of humans that we place our emotional nuances on unemotional objects, such as cute robot rovers.

Picture Source: Mars Exploration Rovers

Source Article: Curiosity takes a ‘belly selfie’ on Mars

Interesting fact about the picture: The Curiosity selfie is actually 92 pictures stitched together to remove the tell-tale, outstretched, selfie arm. Clever robot! aka NASA engineers 😉

Divided Serenity out now on all Amazon stores, and free with Kindle Unlimited.

Divided Serenity Book Cover

An Author on Growing Through Criticism

Great points 🙂

readers+writers journal

 Three Uncomfortable Lessons about Criticism I Learned from Publishing my Book

By Mars Dorian, {grow} Contributing Columnist

I have a new baby.
It’s about two months old, has a compelling name and is loved by me, my family, and close friends. Of course I’m talking about the new sci-fi novel, Fear The Liberator: A Space Opera Novel, I self-published on Amazon. I worked sweats and fears on that darling, had a professional editor and published it with the best intentions.

And for a while, it was good. Sales trickled in, up to 16 per day, as well as many burrows.

Self-Published Author Mars Dorian

I was high-fiving the universe after having launched a book that finally didn’t tank like my two previous books. And then, the first one-star review crept in and vaporized my book like an orbital beam cannon. The critic wrote a 700 word long review that lynched every part of…

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Editing/Proofreading Tips for Indie Authors

Nice self editing tips 🙂

Cassidy's Bookshelves

As an indie author, you are responsible for the entire publishing process – writing, editing, proofreading, publishing, and marketing. But that doesn’t mean that you should do it all yourself. Even if you are working with a low or almost non-existent budget, make sure that you get someone else to participate in the editing process – someone that has editing experience and who won’t be shy about pointing out problems in your manuscript. Your editor can be a paid professional editor or a qualified and capable friend.  You should never unleash your masterpiece on the world without having it properly edited.

Before you submit your work to your editor, make every effort to  weed out as many of the errors in your manuscript as possible. Eliminating simple typos, extra spaces, and so on, will make it easier for your editor to focus on the story flow, the wording, and the important stuff that you simply don’t see because you are…

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