7 Stunning Libraries

The inner book nerd is delighted by this collection. Beautiful buildings full of beautiful books.

1. Trinity College Library in Dublin, Ireland

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2. Mexico City Library

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3. Stuttgart Library

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4. New York Library

http://www.guiadenuevayork.com/new-york-public-library http://www.nypl.org/

Source: https://www.flickr.com/photos/oscarfh/17902282471/

5. The Library of El Escorial in Madrid, Spain

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Source: https://www.flickr.com/photos/cuellar/370663920/

6. Strahov Monastery Library in Prague, Czech Republic

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Source: http://www.larbes.com/

7. Admont Abbey Library in Admont, Austria

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25 thoughts on “7 Stunning Libraries

      1. I hear the one in Seattle is outstanding. San Antonio’s old one has this huge hanging glass art piece (from a famous artist) that was donated for their new addition with an escalator that gives you such a view of the artwork. Books, light, architecture, art, and ideas – libraries do hold the best of mankind?

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  1. I was raised by librarians (my parents met while working in a library, though they both went on to other careers), so I’ve always thought libraries were magical (amazing architecture is a plus, of course, but mostly: books!). I got my first library card when I was three, and I remember going back into the stacks with my father when I was four or five.

    My mother became an art curator and historian, so she always spent a lot of time in libraries. I remember when she was doing a lot of research at the main branch of the New York Public Library and she kept seeing a man working in one of the rooms who she became convinced was Thomas Pynchon (if she was right, he was doing research for Mason & Dixon).

    I also remember my mother saying that the internet was great, but it was no substitute for a qualified research librarian. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

      1. For even more reasons than that, since my father was a writer (semi-pro). He was a humorist, and was usually working on a play or screenplay idea. I remember him at his desk, pounding away at his manual typewrier, occasionally whooping with laughter.

        It made writing seem like a really fun thing to do. 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

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