What do you listen to when you write? #writerslife #amwriting

Being quiet

I am guessing not everyone will share my sentiments, but for me, there is great comfort in being quiet when writing. I write best when I am sitting in my little pod office, with the lovely view of trees, and…absolute quiet.

My husband used to be incredibly noisy, which did present some problems on occasion! Recently, he has become an avid reader (he reads way more than I do now!) and I am delighted that he does this in the quiet. For the most part, when I am writing, I am left alone in this noiseless state. I do deviate occasionally, but more on that below…

E.B. White “I never listen to music when I’m working.”

Background chatter

Yes, this is the writing chimp editing in a coffee shop!

I am a self aware introvert. I accept this is what I am. That said, this desire for silence is a little extreme even amongst the introvert brigade. A few years ago I read the aptly named ‘Quiet’ by Susan Cain, a book all about being an introvert. In it, she talks about her writing routine, and she found it more productive to sit in a coffee shop to work on her book. The background chatter, and the unobtrusive presence of people helped her to focus. For her, too much isolation was actually a bad thing.

Pop music

The concept of writing anything of worth while listening to pop music is beyond my comprehension. But E.L. James  found Will.I.Am blasting in the background an inspiration when tackling her ‘naughty’ scenes! Each to their own…

Classics anyone?

Classic music can create a powerful mood in a movie, but what about when we write? I do have a few pieces that I enjoy occasionally when I want to create a pull in a particular emotional direction. I am not alone in this one…

In an interview Edmund White, the writer of award-winning fiction, biographies and memoirs, said he liked to write to chamber music by Debussy, especially the cello sonata.

Chill-out tunes / a beat without words 

This is probably one of my favorite deviations from silence. I love things with a good beat if I’m writing an action scene. It’s a great tool for visualisations!

Ambient music

A final shout out to the ambient music. Birds, wind, waterfalls, waves, the stuff you hear when you go to the spa…if you go to a spa, that kind of thing. Ambient music is all about creating a mood. There is generally no beat to it (although there might be), just drifting notes that (hopefully) create a strong or peaceful mood.

So, what do you write to?

Thoughts and suggestions? Have I missed any obvious ones? What do you like to write to?

Five Tips for Dealing with Writer’s Block

always nice to pick up a few tips for writer’s block 🙂

A Writer's Path

by Felicity Annora

W R I T E R ‘ S   B L O C K S   &   B R I C K   W A L L S

Creative motors are sputtering, you ran out of enthusiasm water, and there’s a lot more dead ends then you remember seeing on the map. Where did all the brick walls come from?

Lucky for you, I have a few tricks up my sleeve that very well might make your blocks disappear with a poof!

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Angels and demons, a writer’s life #writingquotes #writing #amwriting #writerslife

Most people carry their demons around with them, buried down deep inside. Writers wrestle their demons to the surface, fling them out onto the page, then call them characters.”

~C.K. Webb


People are contradictory by nature, driven by emotions that manifest themselves in actions defying logic or reason.

We are ancient beings trying to live in a modern world, fighting buried instincts that we defeat only some of the time.

Our failings, and our strength to rise above them, are what makes us so interesting.

Our emotions can make us altruistic, and brave, but they can also make us monsters.

Our cognizance of our inner demons is what separates us from the beasts. It is what makes us human.

As writers we love to explore those inner demons and angels, and what keeps us hanging between the two worlds of instinct and moral code.

From the petty jealousy to the rage that can drive us to kill.

From our ability to appreciate fine art to a parent’s love.

Emotions in all their manifestations, their consequence and their repercussions, give writers a reason to write.